Credit Tips for Home Buyers, and Home Owners, to Consider

good-credit-vs-bad-creditYour Credit Score is the most obvious factor in your ability to getting your Mortgage Application approved. The higher your score, typically the less risk you pose to lenders and the lower your mortgage interest rate. So how is your credit score determined? And how can you improve it?
Here are some Credit Tips for Home Buyers to Consider:

• Consumers can obtain free credit score models on-line all with different ranges.
These scores can differ from the FICO score models used by mortgage lenders

      ♦ The Only Website authorized by law to provide the FREE Annual Credit
Report you are entitled to under the Fair Credit Reporting Act
annualcreditreport. com. 

• Mortgage accounts add more points to the FICO score since they are the most
difficult type of credit to qualify for.

• The higher the credit score, the more it drops after a delinquency.
• Most negative info remains on your credit report for 7 years.
• Revolving credit balances can have an extreme impact on credit scores.
     ♦ Revolving credit is classified as credit cards, overdraft protection on checking
accounts, and other lines of credit

• Most experts recommend keeping your overall credit card utilization below 30%.
Lower credit utilization rates suggest to creditors that you can use credit r
responsibly without relying too heavily on it, so a low credit utilization rate may
be correlated with higher credit scores.
You can calculate your credit utilization rate by dividing your total credit card
balances by your total credit card limits. The resulting percentage is a
component used by most of the credit scoring models because it’s often
correlated with lending risk.

• Closing revolving credit cards can reduce scores dramatically since it can alter the balance-to-limit ratio.
      ♦ All of the accounts on your credit reports count, even if they are closed.
• The older the average age of credit, the better it is for FICO scores.
• Seasoned credit is credit accounts that are over 2 years old.
• Consumers with the strongest credit scores tend to have a mix of different
types of accounts.
The key is to manage all these accounts responsibly. Credit scoring models are
looking to see if you can handle all different types of financing as they assess
your creditworthiness.

• When consumers find errors on their credit report, they should speak with a credit expert before calling the creditor directly.
Consumers often rush to call creditors about errors on their credit  report
thinking it will help them. Often times, they may make a statement that
confirms their guilt or makes it more difficult to reach a successful resolution.

Resources: Northshore Advisory. www.northshoreadvisory.com

 

 

Advertisements

First Home Buyer Tips They Don’t Teach You in School

teacher.jpg
You don’t learn about how to buy a house in school. They don’t teach you  what you need to apply for a mortgage, what kind of loan you’ll need, or what PMI is (it’s called private mortgage insurance)

And let’s not mention that you need to shop around for the best deal — or you can hire somebody to do that for you.

So here are some First Home Buyer Tips to help guide you through the home buying experience. 

BEFORE YOU START LOOKING
♦  Have a conversation with your significant other about what you’re millenial 2looking for, what you need and what you can do without. Standing in the living room during an open house with your real estate agent isn’t the time to argue about wanting three bedrooms instead of four.
♦  Know your financial records. What’s your credit score? How much Low Monthly Paymentsoutstanding debt do you have? What monthly payment can you afford?
How much money did you make last year? You’re going to need to know all of this information. Have all of your paperwork ready to go.
♦  Know your limit — if you can’t afford a $450,000 house, don’t go look at $450,000 houses.
♦  Shop around. There are dozens of real estate agents, attorneys, and mortgage officers so don’t settle. These people are going to work for you, their job is to make you happy. You’re going to be on the phone and meeting with them frequently, so make sure you like who you’re working with.
♦  Do your research. When you do decide on a real estate agent, he or she isGet Pre-Approved going to want to know what your price range is, what neighborhoods you’re interested in, if you want to be close to schools, expressways, public transportation, etc. Know what you want and Get Pre-Approved! 

WHILE YOU’RE LOOKING
♦ This is the big one you’ll be glad someone told you about.
Don’t get too attached to a house, because if it the deal doesn’t work out, for whatever reason, you’re going to be devastated.
♦  Be willing to negotiate, it’s a big part of the game.
♦  This goes hand-in-hand with negotiating: put your foot down and don’t let anyone take advantage of you. If the seller is asking for way more than you’re told the house is worth, or if they’re not willing to fix something that is broken or at least negotiate the cost, you have to be ready to walk open houseaway. There will be more houses, trust me.
♦  Don’t just purchase a house by its listing. Go look at EVERYTHING. A lot of houses look different in person than they do on-line, good and bad.

First Home BuyerI have the belief that anyone that deserves to own a home should be able to do so. The American Dream is still attainable for those buyers who do their homework, establish a game plan and work hard to achieve that goal. I’m here to help.

Source: http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/06/buying_your_first_house_things.html

Credit Dos and Don’ts During the Mortgage Process

what-is-good-credit-score
A good credit score is critical when it comes to obtaining the best interest rates and terms on a mortgage. Here are some Credit Dos and Don’ts when looking for a mortgage.

  Do Stay Current on All Existing Accounts. One 30 day notice can hurt you.

­   Do Continue to Use Your Existing Credit As Normal. If it appears your are changing your pattern, it will raise a red flag and your score could go down.

 Don’t Apply for New Credit. Every time you have your credit report pulled by a potential creditor or lender, you can lose ponts on your credit score. This includes co-signing for a loan.

 Don’t Pay-Off Old Collection Accounts or Charge-Offs. Talk to your loan officer first. Yes, you are liable for these debts, but now might not be the time. If you must pay-off these old debts, do it through the closing process of your mortgage. Be sure to request a “letter of deletion” from the creditor.

 Don’t Close Credit Card Accounts. When you close an inactive credit card account, it may appear that your debt ratio has gone up. Closing a card will affect other factors in the score, including credit history.

 Don’t Max Out or Over Charge Credit Card Accounts. Don’t make any large purchases. Keep your credit card balances at 30% of your credit limit before and during the application process. If you do pay down balances, do it equally across the board.

 Don’t Consolidate Your Debt. When you combine all your balances into one or two credit cards, it will appear that you have “maxed out” on that card and you will be penalized.

­   Do Call Your Loan Officer. Talk to you Loan Officer before taking any action that may possibly affect your credit score.

What is A Mortgage Rate Lock?

At some point during the mortgage application process, the borrower must exercise their agreement with the lender to lock in the rate for their final mortgage. 

rate lockWhat is a Mortgage Rate Lock?
A Mortgage Rate Lock protects the borrower from the risk that interest rates will increase during the rate lock period. It guarantees that the lender will offer the borrower a specific combination of interest rate, points or interest rate credit at the closing of their loan.
If market rates rise after the rate is locked, the borrower will still get the lower rate, to the lender’s detriment. But there’s a downside: If rates fall after the rate is locked, the borrower might not be able to take advantage of that opportunity. 

When Can a Mortgage Rate be Locked?
Buyers typically must wait until a seller has accepted their purchase offer for a specific property before they can lock in an interest rate for their mortgage. In addition, the lender must have certain information about the borrower and the details about the transaction before a rate can be locked. This includes receipt of all signed legal disclosures, the borrower’s credit score, anticipated loan-to-value ratio, property type and the borrower’s signed intent to proceed with the transaction. Until all pieces of the puzzle are in place, the lender can not accurately commit to any final interest rate, cost and terms.

How Long Can a Mortgage Rate be Floated?
When a mortgage rate is locked depends on the borrower’s tolerance for risk. The purchase and sales contract dictates when the loan must close. The borrower may opt to let the final mortgage rate ride or “float” with the market until they feel they can get the best deal. Of course they run the risk that the market will turn in their time period and rates will rise from current conditions.
A good mortgage loan officer may have, in good faith, projected a final mortgage rate for processing purposes, but the mortgage application cannot be approved until the final rate has been locked in.
In today’s mortgage processing environment, a mortgage rate could be floated until about 14 days prior to the prescribed closing date. This should give the lender to deliver the final disclosures, the underwriter time for a final review of the application and to issue a “clear to close,” and time for the closing deportment time to deliver closing package to the closing agent.

Should You Choose a Longer Rate Lock Period?
Borrowers are well advised to choose a 45 to 60 day rate lock period to ensure they can get the agreed upon rate even if there is a delay in processing their mortgage application. If a loan fails to close within the rate lock period, the borrower will charged the higher of the original lock and the current interest rate. If rates are higher, the borrower may be offered the opportunity to extend the original rate at a cost of 0.25 points for each 7 day period. (A point equals 1.00% of the base loan amount)

How Much Does a Rate Lock cost?
lockMost lenders will not charge for a Mortgage Rate Lock.  . But a rate lock isn’t free. Rather, a longer rate lock typically involves a higher interest rate, which is more expensive for the borrower. The interest rate or “pricing” difference between a 15-day rate lock and 60-day rate lock might be as little as one-eighth or could be as much as half of a percentage point. The longer period protects the lender from potential market deterioration. The shorter the rate lock period, the more risk the borrower is taking on, but they should be getting a better price.”

No Mortgage Loan officer is an interest guru. But he does understand the lender’s commitment to you and will do his best to honor the rate lock obligation. However, the complexity of your application and issues like: failure to provide additional documentation in a timely manner, appraisal concerns, possible title problems all add time to the process.

There is rarely a reason not to lock a loan as soon as you can. Interest rates change daily, sometimes hourly. To protect yourself against the volatility of the marketplace, it’s a good idea to lock your rate once you are satisfied with the rate. The reason some buyers dislike loan locks is because they want to grind every dime out of a transaction that is humanely possible. Just remember that if the rate was acceptable when it was locked three weeks ago, a drop of an 1/8 of a point or so isn’t the end of the world. You don’t need to be that kind of borrower to get a good deal.

Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/mortgages/questions-rate-lock-answered.aspx#ixzz3cy8lb29i

The Mortgage Underwriter and Your Mortgage Application

The Mortgage Underwriter is one of the most important people in the Mortgage Application process. Without the approval of an underwriter, no lender will fund or close on a loan. It is the job of the underwriter to ensure a borrower can repay the loan they are applying for and to determine that the sales price is supported by the appraisal value before granting lending approval.

app approvedApproval of a Mortgage Application is based on several things: income, credit history, debt ratios, and savings.
♦  A borrower must be able to prove a stable income and job history needed to repay the loan.
♦  They also must have a credit history that reflects a stable record of repaying obligations and a balanced debt to income ratio. Additionally, a borrower’s monthly debt must fall within acceptable limits determined by the loan product’s guidelines.
♦  Lastly the borrower must show that they have enough money saved for their down payment and closing costs. It is also smart to have a few months of mortgage payments saved away in case of an emergency.

It is the Mortgage Underwriter’s job to make sure all of these factors meet particular loan guidelines. The underwriter will evaluate all of this information and sometimes ask for more information or explanations from a borrower to clarify and support their decision on the  Mortgage Application.

Mortgage Underwriters also review the Appraisal to make sure it is accurate and thorough, and that the home is truly worth at least the purchase price. A property’s appraised value is also reviewed by the underwriter to ensure the value supports the amount of the loan you are requesting. A good underwriter will also take into consideration the condition of the property, the location of the property and how it may be affected by natural disasters, such as floods.

An Mortgage Underwriter does his or her best to evaluate the potential risk involved when lending to a borrower. In January 2014, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau enacted stricter requirements on some mortgages, which included tougher background checks into your bank account, spending and employment history.  If an underwriter does not follow all guidelines and makes a poor lending decision and the loan defaults, meaning a borrower stops making payments on their mortgage, it could result in a hefty cost to the lender.

The Mortgage Underwriter has final approval and final responsibility for the Mortgage Loan.  They must make important decisions based on the facts presented in the file, their own judgments and similar application experiences. The Mortgage Underwriter has to take a calculated risk and do his/her best to determine if a file adheres to not just the letter but the intent of the loan program guidelines. It is not an easy job.

CT Mortgage Broker With A Unique Advantage

I’m a Mortgage Broker with a Unique Advantage in the world of Mortgage Finance. The relationships I have formed with trusted lenders over the years means that I can get loans done quicker and closed on time when others may not be able to accomplish anything at all.
The majority of the dozen or so lenders I work with have Account Reps. When these Reps are really good at what they do, and you do a lot of volume with them, they will do everything possible to keep me and my clients happy. The #1 reason … the happier I am with their service, the more loans I will send their way… and the more money they will make!

Every Mortgage Account Rep is always vying for more business. The reason is obvious… they cooperationwant to make more money. Over time, true relationships are formed. I have done business with many of these reps for years and strong bonds have been formed. I know them professionally and they know how much I love my dog.

I wouldn’t try to count the cups of coffee I’ve shared with these Reps. Their message is always the same …When I have a problem with one of my loans, call them ASAP so they can expedite the problem. They always know…if they fix issues, I can deliver on my promise to my clients and that means more future business they’ve earned and deserve.

What Does This Mean To You?
 The relationships that I’ve formed over my 40 years of Mortgage Approvedfinancial service experience means that loans can get done quicker and, when glitches arise, loans can still get closed when the big box banks turn their customers out to the wolves.