Credit Tips for Home Buyers, and Home Owners, to Consider

good-credit-vs-bad-creditYour Credit Score is the most obvious factor in your ability to getting your Mortgage Application approved. The higher your score, typically the less risk you pose to lenders and the lower your mortgage interest rate. So how is your credit score determined? And how can you improve it?
Here are some Credit Tips for Home Buyers to Consider:

• Consumers can obtain free credit score models on-line all with different ranges.
These scores can differ from the FICO score models used by mortgage lenders

      ♦ The Only Website authorized by law to provide the FREE Annual Credit
Report you are entitled to under the Fair Credit Reporting Act
annualcreditreport. com. 

• Mortgage accounts add more points to the FICO score since they are the most
difficult type of credit to qualify for.

• The higher the credit score, the more it drops after a delinquency.
• Most negative info remains on your credit report for 7 years.
• Revolving credit balances can have an extreme impact on credit scores.
     ♦ Revolving credit is classified as credit cards, overdraft protection on checking
accounts, and other lines of credit

• Most experts recommend keeping your overall credit card utilization below 30%.
Lower credit utilization rates suggest to creditors that you can use credit r
responsibly without relying too heavily on it, so a low credit utilization rate may
be correlated with higher credit scores.
You can calculate your credit utilization rate by dividing your total credit card
balances by your total credit card limits. The resulting percentage is a
component used by most of the credit scoring models because it’s often
correlated with lending risk.

• Closing revolving credit cards can reduce scores dramatically since it can alter the balance-to-limit ratio.
      ♦ All of the accounts on your credit reports count, even if they are closed.
• The older the average age of credit, the better it is for FICO scores.
• Seasoned credit is credit accounts that are over 2 years old.
• Consumers with the strongest credit scores tend to have a mix of different
types of accounts.
The key is to manage all these accounts responsibly. Credit scoring models are
looking to see if you can handle all different types of financing as they assess
your creditworthiness.

• When consumers find errors on their credit report, they should speak with a credit expert before calling the creditor directly.
Consumers often rush to call creditors about errors on their credit  report
thinking it will help them. Often times, they may make a statement that
confirms their guilt or makes it more difficult to reach a successful resolution.

Resources: Northshore Advisory. www.northshoreadvisory.com

 

 

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Credit Dos and Don’ts During the Mortgage Process

what-is-good-credit-score
A good credit score is critical when it comes to obtaining the best interest rates and terms on a mortgage. Here are some Credit Dos and Don’ts when looking for a mortgage.

  Do Stay Current on All Existing Accounts. One 30 day notice can hurt you.

­   Do Continue to Use Your Existing Credit As Normal. If it appears your are changing your pattern, it will raise a red flag and your score could go down.

 Don’t Apply for New Credit. Every time you have your credit report pulled by a potential creditor or lender, you can lose ponts on your credit score. This includes co-signing for a loan.

 Don’t Pay-Off Old Collection Accounts or Charge-Offs. Talk to your loan officer first. Yes, you are liable for these debts, but now might not be the time. If you must pay-off these old debts, do it through the closing process of your mortgage. Be sure to request a “letter of deletion” from the creditor.

 Don’t Close Credit Card Accounts. When you close an inactive credit card account, it may appear that your debt ratio has gone up. Closing a card will affect other factors in the score, including credit history.

 Don’t Max Out or Over Charge Credit Card Accounts. Don’t make any large purchases. Keep your credit card balances at 30% of your credit limit before and during the application process. If you do pay down balances, do it equally across the board.

 Don’t Consolidate Your Debt. When you combine all your balances into one or two credit cards, it will appear that you have “maxed out” on that card and you will be penalized.

­   Do Call Your Loan Officer. Talk to you Loan Officer before taking any action that may possibly affect your credit score.